NRCCFI provides over 30 years of relevant and effective training and technical assistance to programs serving children and families of the incarcerated. Options include a variety of formats and structures as well as content that is directly informed by the needs and concerns of those impacted by the criminal justice system: the children, caregivers, incarcerated parents and service delivery providers.

NRCCFI Training Objectives

To provide information about:

  • The impact of incarceration on children, families and communities
  • Family dynamics in families of the incarcerated;
  • Typical feelings of children of the incarcerated;
  • How to increase awareness and understanding of the impact of race, class and ethnicity on children and families of the incarcerated;
  • The importance of self-reflection and insight related to reactions and perspectives on families involved in the criminal justice system; and
  • Strategies for responding to the needs of the children, their parents and families.

Onsite Trainings

NRCCFI offers a number of onsite trainings and consultations on a variety of important topics for people working with children or families of the incarcerated.  No travel is required – we bring these services to you. The content can be tailored to meet your organization’s specific needs.

Contact us to discuss how we can help you.

Topics

General Training on Children of the Incarcerated

  • Who are the Children of Incarcerated Parents?
  • Understanding the Impact of Trauma and Attachment Disruptions on Children of Incarcerated Parents

Responding to the Needs of Children and Families of the Incarcerated in the Community

  • What do children and their caregivers need from programs and services ?
  • How can communities of faith respond to children and families impacted by the criminal justice system?

Mentoring Children of Incarcerated Parents

NRCCFI’s Mentoring Children of the Incarcerated trainings have been delivered to 285 agencies in 48 states. Training topics include:

  • Train the Trainers
  • Match Support: Strategies for Supervision of Mentor/Mentee Relationships When a Parent is Incarcerated
  • Unique Stress of Parental Incarceration: Trauma, Attachment and Resilience Theories for Mentors
  • Engaging Families and Incarcerated Parents in Mentoring Programs
  • Structuring for Success: Policies and Procedures for Mentoring Programs for Children of Incarcerated Parents.

Working with Children of Incarcerated Parents in Schools and Child Care Programs

Children of incarcerated parents are in every school district and Child Care Program in America. Sometimes they are known to the teachers, caregivers and counselors; often they are not. This training provides those that work with children in care and education environments with information and activities designed to increase their capacity to respond to the needs of children of the incarcerated in classrooms, child care, after school programs and school counseling settings.

The Impact of Parental Incarceration on Children in the Child Welfare System

This training, originally designed in 2012 for the New Jersey Department of Children and Families has been delivered to over 300 child welfare workers in New Jersey and has been adapted for use in Michigan and Arizona. The content includes: Understanding yourself, Knowing about the children and families; Recognizing the impact of the criminal justice system on families and on the child welfare workers and  Applying information and strategies to case planning.

When Parents Come Home: The Impact of Parole on Children of Incarcerated Parents and the Programs that Serve Them.

This workshop is designed to explore the issues that arise for children of incarcerated parents when that parent returns from prison. The training will focus on typical reactions to the release of a parent from prison- for children, caregivers, paroled parents, the community and the service delivery agency. This training will include strategies for responding to the needs of paroled parents and their children, address issues and  concerns in identifying and implementing promising vs. evidence based practices.

To find out more about bringing an onsite training to you, please contact us.