Contact Information

NRCCFI at Rutgers–Camden 405-7 Cooper Street
Room 103
Camden, New Jersey 08102
Phone: (856) 225-2718
nrccfi@camden.rutgers.edu

New & Notable

Welcome to Our New Site!

Welcome to the new National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers University–Camden. The center, which began as the Federal Resource Center on Children of Prisoners in the 1990s, joined forces with the Family and Corrections Network in 2003 creating the oldest and largest organization to focus on justice involved families in the US. ... Read more ...

Life Beyond Bars: Children with an Incarcerated Parent. Fact Sheet # 7 from the University of Wisconsin

“Life Beyond Bars: Children with an Incarcerated Parent,’ prepared by intern Neil Damron and released in November 2014, examines the latest research findings concerning the effects of a parent’s incarceration on children.” Read Full Release

Tools for Assessing Attachment for Children of the Incarcerated Central Connecticut State University and NRCCFI Survey

How do you measure children’s attachment to an incarcerated parent? How do you use the information? We are conducting a brief survey that will help us to understand current practices and procedures used to implement attachment assessments in a variety of settings. It is an exploratory effort to gather data which can potentially inform best ... Read more ...

The Echoes of Incarceration Project partnered with Sesame Street to create a powerful new film about visiting incarcerated parents.

The Echoes of Incarceration Project collaborates with Sesame Street:Echoes of Incarceration – which trains youth with incarcerated parents in filmmaking and advocacy skills, partnered with Sesame Street to create a powerful new film about visiting. It was released this week on the social media site Upworthy.  View the video HERE: https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=905053386202187&pnref=storyIt has had  over 800,000 views ... Read more ...

Tools for Assessing Attachment for Children of the Incarcerated

Central Connecticut State University and NRCCFI are conducting a brief survey that will look at current practices and procedures used to implement attachment assessments for children of incarcerated parents.

Los Angeles Summit Will Explore the Latest Developments Regarding the Impact of Toxic Stress and Trauma on Children and Families of the Incarcerated

A Summit to explore the latest developments regarding the impact of toxic stress and trauma on children and families of the incarcerated and interventions and responses that promote their well-being. Expert speakers will include caregivers, youth and family members, scholars, law enforcement officials, and child welfare administrators. Read More.

S.E.E.K. 2014 findings discussed at meetings in Michigan

Meetings were convened in Flint and Lansing, Michigan on November 21,2014 by the Michigan Public Health Institute to discuss emerging issues among children of incarcerated parents and to communicate results from the Michigan longitudinal study, Project S.E.E.K (Services to Enable and Empower Children of Incarcerated Parents) Carol Burton, coordinator of the original Project S.E.E.K. which ... Read more ...

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Home » Training & Technical Assistance » Telephone Training » Past Telephone Training CD Order Form » Mentoring Children of Prisoners: Issues, Concerns and Strategies

Mentoring Children of Prisoners: Issues, Concerns and Strategies

Mentoring Children of Prisoners: Issues, Concerns and Strategies: CD Description

Length: one hour Type: audio-conference Trainers: Ann Adalist-Estrin of Family and Corrections Network & Arlene Lee of the Federal Resource Center for Children of Prisoners. Date: 6/23/04 Cost: $75 Synopsis: Ann and Arlene share strategies for mentors and trainers of mentors from their new publication, “Mentoring Children of Prisoners Curriculum.” Principles of effective mentoring will be applied to a variety of real life stories about children of prisoners. When mentoring children of prisoners, agencies should have two priorities: 1. Equip mentors with realistic expectations. How? Provide specific information about children of prisoners. Provide opportunities for mentors to examine their feelings, biases and perspectives about the children and their families through ongoing supervision. 2. Promote longevity of the mentoring relationship. How? Provide avenues for involving the caregivers and incarcerated parents. Provide opportunities to practice communicating about difficult issues, building trust with caregivers and supporting the child’s relationship with the incarcerated parent. This CD training addresses the issues and concerns that programs meet when planning and organizing to mentor children of prisoners. This training also reviews research on mentoring and mentoring children of prisoners. In the last 5 years, mentoring programs have emerged from the shadows to the spotlight as part of an overall process of identifying strategies for responding to the needs of children of prisoners. Agencies and organizations, nationwide are developing mentoring programs for children of prisoners. They are adapting traditional mentoring programs to this population, designing new programs specifically focused on children of prisoners, or initiating collaborations with other programs and organizations to combine and blend services. This training will help agencies organize and plan more effectively to mentor children of prisoners.

Disclaimer: Listing on this website does not constitute an endorsement of or recommendation for said entity or its mission and philosophies by NRCCFI at Rutgers University–Camden, its staff, consultants, advisers, directors or funders. Reasonable efforts have been made to confirm the validity and viability of programs, organizations or resources listed on this website.