See Us Support us – Changing the language, changes the lens

  The Power of Words           By Jasmine Robles, Rutgers University Senior and  NRCCFI student coordinator of See Us Support Us 2016. Words matter because they have the power to shape a human’s feelings about themselves and others. Communication is essential in all relationships, as it permits us to share our interests, concerns, and support. … Read more of See Us Support us – Changing the language, changes the lens

Shifting the Narrative See Us Support Us Month Continues…

NRCCFI Director Ann Adalist-Estrin helped the Osborne Association kick off the See Us Support Us Campaign in New York on October 5 by giving an address at John Jay College of Criminal Justice entitled “Guiding Principles for Responding to Children and Families of the Incarcerated “One of those Guiding Principles was Honor the Resilience in … Read more of Shifting the Narrative See Us Support Us Month Continues…

College and Children of the Incarcerated

The college application process can be daunting, but even more than that is the prospect of paying for the ever-rising costs of higher education. At the National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated, the third most common request is for information on scholarships for children with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated parents (CIPs). We have been unable to provide very many specific resources for CIPs and their families. This is primarily because there are few organizations that provide scholarships for this specific segment of students preparing to or attending higher educational institutions.

Project SEEK

Researcher will revisit Project S.E.E.K. (Services to Enable and Empower Kids), the country’s only comprehensive program and longitudinal study on children of incarcerated parents. Funded by the Ruth Mott Foundation, a team in Michigan led by Carol F. Burton in partnership with the Michigan Public health Institute will conduct a small exploratory study that will include interviews.