See Us Support us – Changing the language, changes the lens

  The Power of Words           By Jasmine Robles, Rutgers University Senior and  NRCCFI student coordinator of See Us Support Us 2016. Words matter because they have the power to shape a human’s feelings about themselves and others. Communication is essential in all relationships, as it permits us to share our interests, concerns, and support. … Read more of See Us Support us – Changing the language, changes the lens

October Was See Us Support Us Month!

The National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers Camden is joining the Osborne Association in New York and two California Coalitions: Alameda County Children of Incarcerated Parents (ACCIPP) and San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents partnership (SFCIPP) in the See Us Support Us Campaign. All month-and beyond-this-campaign will focus public … Read more of October Was See Us Support Us Month!

Shifting the Narrative See Us Support Us Month Continues…

NRCCFI Director Ann Adalist-Estrin helped the Osborne Association kick off the See Us Support Us Campaign in New York on October 5 by giving an address at John Jay College of Criminal Justice entitled “Guiding Principles for Responding to Children and Families of the Incarcerated “One of those Guiding Principles was Honor the Resilience in … Read more of Shifting the Narrative See Us Support Us Month Continues…

The National Institute of Corrections Published a New Guide on video visiting authored by The Osborne Association.

The document “Video Visiting in Corrections: Benefits, Limitations, and Implementation Considerations.” The purpose of the NIC guide is to inform the development of video visiting programs within correctional settings. The authors examine this important national trend from a variety of perspectives including the needs of children and families of the incarcerated.

S.E.E.K. 2014 findings discussed at meetings in Michigan. Executive Summary released.

Meetings were convened in Flint and Lansing, Michigan on November 21,2014 by the Michigan Public Health Institute to discuss emerging issues among children of incarcerated parents and to communicate results from the Michigan longitudinal study, Project S.E.E.K (Services to Enable and Empower Children of Incarcerated Parents) Carol Burton, coordinator of the original Project S.E.E.K. which … Read more of S.E.E.K. 2014 findings discussed at meetings in Michigan. Executive Summary released.